Gps tracking system for mobile phones

 

Shippers want to be able to give their clients accurate information on the whereabouts of the containers, anywhere enroute: over the ocean AND overland in a seamless and efficient way.

Governments want to ensure that cargo arriving on land is properly taxed and that no ‘leakage’ is occurring during transit. They also want to know that dangerous goods aren’t being smuggled into their country.

Importers want to ensure that the goods they are bring into a country will arrive securely, complete and intact. They also want to know WHEN they will arrive and be ready for pick up.

Gps tracking system for mobile phones

The GPS project was launched in the United States in 1973 to overcome the limitations of previous navigation systems, [3] integrating ideas from several predecessors, including a number of classified engineering design studies from the 1960s. The U.S. Department of Defense developed the system, which originally used 24 satellites. It became fully operational in 1995. Roger L. Easton of the Naval Research Laboratory , Ivan A. Getting of The Aerospace Corporation , and Bradford Parkinson of the Applied Physics Laboratory are credited with inventing it. [4]

Advances in technology and new demands on the existing system have now led to efforts to modernize the GPS and implement the next generation of GPS Block IIIA satellites and Next Generation Operational Control System (OCX). [5] Announcements from Vice President Al Gore and the White House in 1998 initiated these changes. In 2000, the U.S. Congress authorized the modernization effort, GPS III .

In addition to GPS, other systems are in use or under development, mainly because of a potential denial of access and potential monitoring by the US government. The Russian Global Navigation Satellite System ( GLONASS ) was developed contemporaneously with GPS, but suffered from incomplete coverage of the globe until the mid-2000s. [6] GLONASS can be added to GPS devices which makes more satellites available and enables positions to be fixed more quickly and accurately, to within two meters. [7] There are also the European Union Galileo positioning system and China's BeiDou Navigation Satellite System .

Shippers want to be able to give their clients accurate information on the whereabouts of the containers, anywhere enroute: over the ocean AND overland in a seamless and efficient way.

Governments want to ensure that cargo arriving on land is properly taxed and that no ‘leakage’ is occurring during transit. They also want to know that dangerous goods aren’t being smuggled into their country.

Importers want to ensure that the goods they are bring into a country will arrive securely, complete and intact. They also want to know WHEN they will arrive and be ready for pick up.

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