Khmer dvd shop

 

Phnom Penh is the capital and largest city of Cambodia , located at the confluence of the Mekong and the Tonle Sap rivers.

Despite being a bit rough on the edges, Phnom Penh retains its former charm as a leafy South East Asian capital with a nice riverside promenade and numerous beautiful Cambodian Buddhist wats, palaces, and other artifacts. A large infrastructure catering to tourists makes it easily accessible, and many consider it to be one of the friendliest capitals in Asia, as Cambodians have not yet become jaded by mass tourism. Widespread poverty can still be seen, as in all of Cambodia, and increasing traffic can be a problem at certain times of the day.

It is a bit unfortunate that one of the tourist industry's selling points for Phnom Penh has to do with wars that took place in the 1970's (i.e. Killing Fields, Toul Sleng), as tourists may associate the city with these historical events when in fact Cambodian culture, including its art and music is quite remarkable and modern day Cambodia is a friendly and youthful place that has nothing to do with remote dark chapters in the country's history.

Khmer dvd shop

A SMALL crowd has gathered behind me at the bar. I am sipping an ice-cold Angkor beer and scrolling through my best photos of the day. I just happen to have stopped on a rather moody shot of the sun rising over Phnom Bakheng. Big deal you might say – just another temple snap. But my photo is remarkable. There are no tourists in the frame. People describe a visit to Angkor Wat as an Indiana Jones adventure and that is true on many levels. You will indeed clamber through misty jungle vines and over ancient ruins but you’ll be searching for another kind of Holy Grail. Forget tatty old cups – the sacred prize here is a tourist-free temple experience.

If you’ve managed to photograph a temple unblemished by scrambling camera-waving crowds – expect questions, a lot of them. Which temple is that? What time did you get there? Which gate did you enter through? The search for peace is a Siem Reap obsession. Los Angeles has its crystal meth, here it's crowd dodging. People huddled in cafes furtively swap information, maps splayed and pens scribbling. Saunter past their table and the whispers will halt abruptly. Unless you have a hot tip to peddle – you’re just another temple hogger. But if you’ve got a photo like mine, pull up a seat and let the insider trading begin. Get the low-down in our Angkor temple guide section.

You might successfully dodge a crowd of snap-happy Japanese holidaymakers, but you definitely won’t escape the attentions of the army of children who patrol the temple perimeters selling scarves and postcards for, you guessed it, “one dollar.” While the constant barrage of “What your name? Where you come from” is likely to drive you nuts, you can’t help but be charmed by their sharp wit and, at times, hilarious banter.

Phnom Penh is the capital and largest city of Cambodia , located at the confluence of the Mekong and the Tonle Sap rivers.

Despite being a bit rough on the edges, Phnom Penh retains its former charm as a leafy South East Asian capital with a nice riverside promenade and numerous beautiful Cambodian Buddhist wats, palaces, and other artifacts. A large infrastructure catering to tourists makes it easily accessible, and many consider it to be one of the friendliest capitals in Asia, as Cambodians have not yet become jaded by mass tourism. Widespread poverty can still be seen, as in all of Cambodia, and increasing traffic can be a problem at certain times of the day.

It is a bit unfortunate that one of the tourist industry's selling points for Phnom Penh has to do with wars that took place in the 1970's (i.e. Killing Fields, Toul Sleng), as tourists may associate the city with these historical events when in fact Cambodian culture, including its art and music is quite remarkable and modern day Cambodia is a friendly and youthful place that has nothing to do with remote dark chapters in the country's history.

The name Siem Reap literally means "Siam Defeated". These days, however, the only rampaging hordes are the tourists heading to the Angkor Archaeological Park. This once quaint village has become the largest boom town and construction site in Cambodia. It's quite laid-back and a pleasant place to stay while touring the temples and a nice compromise between observing Cambodian life and enjoying the amenities of modern services and entertainment, thanks to a large expatriate community.

Since Siem Reap is a major tourist destination, prices in many instances are higher than elsewhere in Cambodia . Expect to receive almost constant offers for motodop and tuk-tuk rides, along with everything else which drivers may be able to offer to you.

Be sure to pick up your free Siem Reap Angkor Visitors Guide and the equally free and useful Siem Reap Pocket Guide from your hotel/guesthouse. It contains lots of info on Siem Reap and the Angkor Archaeological Park, including hotel/bar/restaurant/shop info, travel info, and maps. For the eco-sensitive tourist, check out "Stay Another Day: Cambodia," a detailed guide with local spots that support the environment and community. Another address is the ConCERT tourist office, a local NGO committed to raising the standards of responsible tourism and ecotourism activities and providing information on the causes and effects of poverty in Cambodia, volunteering opportunities and ecotours.