Mobile spy vulnerability

 

Malware samples are available for download by any responsible whitehat researcher. By downloading the samples, anyone waives all rights to claim punitive, incidental and consequential damages resulting from mishandling or self -infection.

Mobile spy vulnerability

A major security flaw in Android lets an attacker take control of a phone simply by sending a text message – and for the vast majority of Android users, there’s no fix available yet.

Even the small number of people using Google’s own line of Android phones, sold under the Nexus brand, are vulnerable to some of the effects of the bug, according to Joshua Drake , the researcher who discovered the flaw.

The weakness affects a part of the Android operating system, called Stagefright, that lets phones and tablets display media content. A maliciously crafted video can be used to deliver a program which will run on the phone as soon as it is processed by Stagefright, potentially letting an attacker do anything from read and delete data to spy on the owner through their camera and microphone.

Malware samples are available for download by any responsible whitehat researcher. By downloading the samples, anyone waives all rights to claim punitive, incidental and consequential damages resulting from mishandling or self -infection.

There are certain things you do not want to share with strangers. In my case it was a stream of highly personal text messages from my husband, sent during the early days of our relationship. Etched on my phone's SIM card - but invisible on my current handset and thus forgotten - here they now are, displayed in all their brazen glory on a stranger's computer screen.

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I've just walked into a windowless room on an industrial estate in Tamworth, UK, where three cellphone analysts in blue shirts sit at their terminals, scrutinising the contents of my phone and smirking. "If it's any consolation, we would have found them even if you had deleted them," says one.

Espionage (colloquially, spying ) is the obtaining of information considered secret or confidential without the permission of the holder of the information. [1] Espionage can be committed by an individual or a spy ring (a cooperating group of spies), in the service of a government or a company, or operating independently. The practice is inherently clandestine , as it is by definition unwelcome and in many cases illegal and punishable by law. Espionage is a subset of " intelligence " gathering, which includes espionage as well as information gathering from public sources.

Espionage is often part of an institutional effort by a government or commercial concern. However, the term is generally associated with state spying on potential or actual enemies primarily for military purposes. Spying involving corporations is known as industrial espionage .

Further information on clandestine HUMINT ( human intelligence ) information collection techniques is available, including discussions of operational techniques , asset recruiting , and the tradecraft used to collect this information.